• We Are Hiring
  • WAGpedia
  • Articles
    • Whatsapp
      • DogSpot makes shopping easier via instant messaging!
        Whatsapp us on +91- 9599090487 and let us know what your furry friend requires and we will get your order delivered.

5 Heartwarming Stories That Prove Dog Is Man's Best Friend!

08 Jul 2016 | by Prekshita Patwa | Posted in: Wag News

Dogs aren't just heroes. They're our companions. They are always loyal. Dogs are what makes this world a little better for us dog lovers. Their stories start from being brave to being patient enough to wait for their humans for years till saving hundreds of human lives. These stories will give you goosebumps! For sure:

1. Fido

Sad-dog-e1382258367817

Image Source: listverse

There are plenty of stories of dogs who stood vigil for dead masters for years afterwards. Among the most well-known loyal dogs were Hachiko, and Greyfriars Bobby. Hachiko and Greyfriars Bobby have had numerous books and even films made about them. But the loyal dog who was most famous during his own lifetime is probably the least well-known. Fido was born in Italy sometime during World War II. He was found on the verge of death by a kiln worker who took him home and nursed him back to health. And for this, he’d have Fido’s unwavering loyalty for the rest of his life. Every day, Fido waited for his master at the same bus stop, refusing to move until he stepped off the bus—and this at a time when Italy was being bombed almost daily. But one day, Fido’s master didn’t return. He’d been killed in an air raid while at work. Fido, ever vigilant, still turned up to wait for him. Every day. For 14 Years.

His tale spread across Italy until Fido became a constant source of media attention, both during the war and long after it ended. Surviving footage shows that huge crowds would turn up to watch him make his way to the bus stop every day, watch everyone get off, then walk away disappointed when the bus pulled off. He received honors and medals, but all he wanted was for his friend to come home. He never did. Don’t worry—it’s okay to cry.

 

2. Barry

St-Bernard-e1382258236432

Image Source: listverse

 

The Saint Bernard is a dog that was specifically bred for a single purpose—to search and rescue. Monks at the Saint Bernard Pass, a dangerous, snowy divide between Switzerland and Italy, bred them for hundreds of years—perhaps even as far back as 1695—to rescue travellers who got lost and buried in the snow. They travelled in pairs so that when they found a victim, one dog could dig them out and sit on them for warmth while the other headed back to the monastery for help. Which brings us to the second Saint Bernard on our list—Barry, who saved 40 people's lives over the course of 12 years in the early 1800s.

Barry’s most famous rescue was a small child who’d become lost and trapped on a treacherous ice shelf. Barry managed to reach the boy, revive him, and keep him warm until rescue arrived. But even then, nobody could get to them. So Barry allowed the child to climb onto his back and pulled him to safety, inch by inch. Barry was so effective as a rescue dog that after his departure there was always one dog at the monastery named Barry—a tradition that persists till today

 

3. Swansea Jack

Black-dog-e1382258070278

Image Source: listverse

 

Swansea Jack was a black retriever who lived with his owner William Thomas near the River Tawe in Swansea, Wales, during the 1930s. One day, Jack saw a small boy drowning in the river and ran in, pulling the boy to shore by the scruff of his neck. There was no one around to see it, and had circumstances been different, the boy would probably have spent the rest of his life telling the story to people who would never believe him. But Jack wasn’t done. Within a few weeks, Jack rescued another swimmer, this time with witnesses in attendance. And then another. And another. And so on. Over the course of the next decade, Jack was reported to have saved at least 27 people from, presumably, the most dangerous river and docks in Wales.

For his efforts over the course of his lifetime, Jack was given a silver collar by Swansea council, the Bravest Dog of the Year Award, a silver cup from the Mayor of London, and his very own statue. That’s more accolades than your average Batman. And he’s still recognized today—he was probably the inspiration for the nickname of Premier League football team Swansea FC, “The Swansea Jacks.”

 

4. Bud Nelson

Bud-Nelson-e13822582847911

Image Source: listverse

 

Just one look at Bud Nelson is enough to tell you that he was the greatest dog who ever lived. He’s an old-timey dog wearing goggles in a scratchy black-and-white photo—if he hadn’t existed, he would have been dreamed up for a steampunk novel or Bioshock game. The human in the photo is Bud Nelson’s owner, a doctor called Horatio Nelson. Horatio was the first man to cross America by car in the year 1903, with his hilariously named co-driver Sewall K. Crocker and, of course, Bud. That made Bud the first dog to cross the United States by car.

At the time, the automobile was still in its infancy, meaning that driving was neither safe nor fun. The car was a roofless monstrosity with little to no suspension to protect them from the mostly unpaved roads, and it would have made a lot of noise while belching out noxious smoke. But Bud Nelson was braver around the thing than some people would have been back then. He was given the goggles to protect his eyes and sat there looking just as happy as he does in the photo. 

 

5. Rolf

Clever-dog-e1382258019608

Image Source: listverse

 

Rolf was either the smartest dog in history or the centre of a scam that fooled a nation—specifically Nazi Germany. Either way, then, he was pretty awesome. According to the Nazis, Rolf could talk. To put this into context, the Nazis backed a lot of hair-brained schemes during World War II, and one of the most hair-brained was trying to train an army of super intelligent dogs to share their ideals.

The smartest of these “super dogs” was Rolf. Apparently, Rolf was able to talk by tapping his paw against a board and using a sort of special dog Morse code to communicate with humans. It was using this code that he was able to converse, appreciate poetry, express his pride in the Nazi regime, and vent his blinding hatred of the French. Apparently, he even expressed an interest in joining the war effort and fighting on the front lines. We don’t expect you to believe that a dog could talk, but Hitler certainly did. He took a great interest in Rolf, and history’s greatest monster wasting time on the ridiculous notion that the Nazis had created the world’s first racist dog could only possibly be a good thing.

 

These brave dogs stole my heart! I wish I were alive in those days to personally meet them. 

Got any awesome story to share from your own experience? Feel free to share it with us below in the comments! We love our heroes!

 

Views and Articles are not endorsed by DogSpot.in. DogSpot does not assume responsibility or liability for any Comment or for any claims, damages, or losses resulting from any use of the Site or the materials contained therein. All contributions and Articles are owned by DogSpot.in.